oojah

oojah
Noun. A 'what's its name ?', a thing whose name has been forgotten. Often extended with other humorous additions, e.g. "An oojah ma bob", or "An oojah ma thingy."

English slang and colloquialisms. 2014.

Игры ⚽ Нужна курсовая?

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